Q&A re: Saab 9-4x in Sweden

Much has been made of the fact that there’s no diesel engine for the Saab 9-4x in Europe. Those who wish to bring their dissatisfaction to the surface again with the advent of this post – please save your keystrokes. It’s a regrettable situation, but everything’s been said already.

With that out of the way, Vi Bilgare in Sweden threw a few questions about the Saab 9-4x at Saab’s Swedish PR Manager, Hans-Jörgen Brandt, in their November 30 print issue.

The resulting article has been translated for us by JH:

Q: – Will there be differences between the 9-4X and the SRX in terms of the engine and gearbox? We drove the SRX with the 3-litre direct injection V6 engine with 260 hp and an automatic gearbox.
A: – The engine will be upgraded.

Q: – Will there be differences between the 9-4X and the SRX in terms of suspension, springs, shock absorbers, four-wheel-drive systems etc.?
A: – Yes, it will be customized for the Saab 9-4X.

Q: – What type of four-wheel-drive systems is it in the SRX and the 9-4X?
A: – Haldex.

Q: – Will there be a diesel engine? When? Where does it come from?
A: – Currently the engine lineup consists of the two engines that has antecedently been announced.

Q: – Are the prices for the 9-4X in Sweden finalised yet?
A: – No, they are not finalised yet.

Q: – Which is the target group for the 9-4X in Sweden?
A: – The target group is the customers who wants a different experience in the exciting and growing crossover segment.

Q: – Does Saab have the opportunity to cancel the 9-4X-project if it is not possible to find a diesel engine?
A: Saab has no plans to break signed contracts.

——

Of course, the interesting quote there is that the 3.0V6 will be upgraded in some way from the engine in 9-4x’s ugly sibling, the Cadillac SRX.

Outputs listed in the 9-4x press material indicate that the same power will be produced from this engine, so what form this upgrade will take remains a mystery. Perhaps it will be an emissions difference a-la the work done recently on the Saab 9-3 TTiD. Vi Bilgare called the SRX’s 269 g/km “planet-warming”.

I guess we’ll find out more when the model comes around for European launch.

Carl
Guest
Carl

9-4x are not coming in à diesel version, because the GM V6 diesel not hit the market.
I have heard by a friend in the automotive world that Saab Will come With à 9-5x late 2011.
The 9-5x will come in diffrent diesel versions.
Anyone Who have heard the same?

Robert P
Guest
Robert P
Really looking forward to see the 9-4x hit European markets, but indeed, with 269g/km, the price of this car will be sky-high over here (in Holland at least, where taxes are added over the CO2 exhaust). Off topic, but great for Saab Diesel drivers I think: We heard from several sources -amoung which the Saab importer over here- that the 2012 9-5 Diesel manual can be ordered without the sport-chassis. Solves one of the often heard drawbacks of the entry-level-fleet-owners 9-5. Not having to drive in a kidney pulveriser, but in a comfortable (yet sturdy) car makes us consider leasing… Read more »
Me
Guest
Me
The case is quite simple. They want to sell the most units in The US/Canada, China and Russia. Then there will be some RHD Units for the Australian Market, and if they sell more that thousand in Europe on top of that, they will be quite happy. There is a market for the 9-4x in Europe, as there is a Market for the non-Diesel Cayenne. Furthermore Cadillac is also returning to Europe with the SRX, so GM does also think that there is a market for such a car in Europe. The Cadillac SRX will cost in Europe from 52.950… Read more »
Thylmuc
Guest
Thylmuc

The Cayenne base model needs to be compared to the 9-4x 2.8T, as they both have 221 kW power and the same topspeed (230 km/h). To me, it is evident that Saab will have a hard time selling those if they ask a similar price. They need to be below 50000,-€, and presumably below 45000€ for the 3.0. At 53000€, Cadillac will sink once more.

Robert
Guest

Perhaps the upgrade will be to convert the 3.0l engine for ethanol E85….that would also give the marketing department a good selling argument here in Europe despite the lack of a diesel engine and the otherwise horrific co2 output of this engine ….

JH
Guest
JH

Good news that the engine will be upgraded! 🙂
Probably they have reprogrammed the engine management system to lower the fuel consumption and emissons. Maybe Trionic is on its way back? 🙂

However, I still don’t understand why the 2-litre 190 hp TTiD engine from the 9-5 can’t be put in the 9-4X as well…

TuuSaR
Guest
TuuSaR

Heh nice and positive Swedish press as always “can you still cancel it”.

Dippen
Guest
Dippen

offtopic: Saab appoints new dealership in Scotland
http://www.easier.com/81765-saab-dealership-scotland.html

David
Guest
David

New question: What type of all wheel drive system does the new Buick LaCross have?

I wonder if it has the same XWD with eLSD as the new 9-5.

Rune
Guest
Rune

David, I do not know and hopefully someone will answer.

Meanwhile, while googling a bit around, I found this website: http://www.haldex-xwd.com/

What struck me is that the timeline entry dated 2007 says that Saab started using XWD. However, eLSD is not mentioned until 2008 where they write about the Opel Insignia. There was a time when it was doubted that the Insignia would even have eLSD and now they’re too shy to tell people that it first showed up in a 9-3…? 🙁

Are Haldex upset now that Saab are cooperating with someone else?

Me
Guest
Me

Rune,
the Insignia was car of the year, thus it is a better option from the marketing point of view. And there is already one Saab i that list, Haldex wants to show that many car manufacturers are using their systems.
But on the other side, they may be upset, as the Saab team that worked with Haldex on the XWD and the eLSD are now in the e-AAM joint venture,

Me
Guest
Me

David, everything based on Eps II or Delta II uses XWD, and some times even with eLSD. Saab developed it with Haldex for GM.

Rune (Oslo, Norway)
Guest
Rune (Oslo, Norway)
I had a conversation with the people at SAAB in Oslo today. During the conversation it turned up that several people was interested in the 9-4X, even though it only will be delivered with gasolin engines. These are people who normally would consider a Mercedes ML or BMW X3 or X5 with gasolin engines. So, despite the tremendous taxes on cars in Norway, and gasolin in particular, there are still people who want the 9-4X here. Another good thing is that SAAB in Norway are selling around 100 cars a month now, mostly to private persons, and the trend is… Read more »
Rune
Guest
Rune

Rune (lovely name btw), did they say anything about green license plates?

I guess the 9-4x won’t fit a 1m tall crate in the back?

Rune (Oslo, Norway)
Guest
Rune (Oslo, Norway)

You are right about that Rune 🙂
Green lisence plates was not part of the conversation. It didn’t cross my mind actually, and I have not seen the measures of the boot

Johan
Guest
Johan

Oh yeah, there will also be a minor upgrade of the interior in both 9-3 and 9-5.

But not so much on the inside. Mostly on the outside what I have heard.

Rune (Oslo, Norway)
Guest
Rune (Oslo, Norway)

The 9-3 will get an upgrade / facelift both inside and outside, yes. However, to what degree, I do not know, or if the exterior facelift will be more substansual than inside.

Anybody who knows if Castriota have had time to play a part in this facelift? Would be interesting to know if this would give a clue to the next 9-3 to arrive in 2012.

chemosaaby
Guest
chemosaaby

Could someone explain to me why such a big stink (pardon the pun) is being made about the 9-4x not having a diesel engine? WHY are diesels so friggin’ popular in Europe?

Rune
Guest
Rune

chemosaaby: Taxes.

Robert
Guest
Robert

More torque, less consumption (MUCH less in urban areas), at the same time diesel being cheaper than gasoline at the fuel pumps, less polution….need any other arguments?

MagnusE
Guest
MagnusE

And diesel in europe is low sulphur, so it don’t stink (as much) …

zippy
Guest
zippy

My guess is that anyone who wants a TTid would go for the 9-5SC anyway.

JeremyP
Guest
JeremyP

Any inclination if there will be a 2.0T gas engine in the 9-4X or is that just wishful thinking on my part? I have seen it mentioned but not with the fervor or frequency of the diesel conversation. I for one would love it with a 2.0T. Better MPG, less emissions, better engine I would say, a good unique selling point in this class, and more ‘Saab’ to my eyes. Am I alone in the wilderness on this one?!?!?!

hipchecker
Guest
hipchecker

No, you are not. There are many other people out there keeping their fingers crossed for a 2.0T, fuel-efficient 9-4x.

Only time will tell.

Jimmy B
Guest
Jimmy B

http://www.corren.se/ostergotland/linkoping/?articleId=5460575&date=&menuids= It says that this is the second new 9-5 on a short period to burst put in flames :S thats not good

Ola
Guest
Ola

Well I think you should hold your horses. I read about that and rumor has it was caused by the dealer in Linköping (a badly setup engine warmer). This is what happened to the first car, and the second car was also bought in Linköping. So.. two cars from the same dealers…?

michaelb
Guest
michaelb
I do not think everything has been said here. The big trends in global car sales and production are quite simple. The percentage of Diesel engines will rise further worldwide, and the percentage of clean diesels – engines with ulta-low sulfur emissions – will jump. The future preferred engines will be diesel-hybrids – the electric engine for the city, the diesel for the highway. Diesel engines benefit from much lower fuel consumption, substantially lower prices at the pump in most European countries compared to gasoline, from taxation and regulation impacts with regard to CO2-emissions, and finally, from restrictions in fleet… Read more »
andha
Guest
andha
Michaelb: Spot on in most aspects but as much as I would like to see a diesel in the 9-4x in order to be competitive in Europe I think it would be wiser to spend your money on hybrid/electrical solutions. I hope that SAAB will spend all its money on getting the true electric stuff to the market instead of spending money on fitting new diesels in existing cars. If they succeed in doing so in say the next 2 years the need for big six cylinder diesels will vanish. The tourque is in the electric motor and you will… Read more »
Bernard
Guest
Bernard
Michael, The real medium-term solution is HCCI, which is a combination of compression ignition with gasoline. We know that Saab was working on this in the GM days, however things have been very quiet on that front. I really don’t think that diesel will make much headway in the US (which has low-sulfur fuels by the way). VW sells a few to the high-mileage crowd, and the German luxury brands offer them on their SUVs. Nobody else even wants to enter the market. The reason that Audi/BMW/Merc offer some diesels is to meet CAFE (average fuel economy) standards and avoid… Read more »
smurf
Guest
smurf
In Europe we have low sulphur fuel (gasoline and diesel) which contributes to lower raw particulate emissions. A direct injection gasoline engine does without no doubt have bigger problems with upcoming particulate legislations than equivalent diesel equipped with particulate filter. The only draw back of the diesel is the nitrogen oxide emissions compared to a gasoline engine. + Very fuel efficient + High torque at low speed => great driveability + New diesels don’t have the characteristic diesel rattle noise – Cost, somewhat more expensive – Weight – Nitrogen oxides (can be taken care of, there are 50 state legal… Read more »
Johan
Guest
Johan

I must say that I agree with Swade! Stop talking about the diesel!! I know for the fact that SAAB tried there best!! But you also need to stay with your contracts and not do stuff just because!! You need to make money on the products your selling and I know from the facts that SAABs only option was a poor 4cyl diesel or scrap the 9-4x completly! So let it go once and for all!!

Carl-Henrik
Guest
Carl-Henrik

True.

The only time that type of engine will be included is when the production of the 9-4X is moved back home to Trollhättan for a 2:nd generation and it is based on a new standard platform from Saab themselves. Now they are confined by an agreement with GM that rules out the diesel, but so what, it is still a great car.

Johan
Guest
Johan

And Volvo goes with small engines too achive 119g/km and SAAB doesnt! One of the SAAB core values is a fun car to drive and a small engine isnt fun.

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