SU Hi-Po Challenge: Entry #5

Time for another Hi-Po Challenge entry, this time from Alan H.

This proposal uses a lot of things that are at Saab’s disposal right now, which makes it more affordable, however there is still no identification as to what element of the current program gets the chop.

Additionally, the engine choice just won’t cut it as far as the Hi-Po advocates that I’ve seen in comments are concerned. It’s highly unlikely that it would tune to the baseline power requirement and even if it could be tuned that high, there would likely be serious refinement issues when compared to the class of vehicle it would expect to go up against.

My thanks to Alan for the proposal.

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To get a cost effective halo car to market quickly (i.e. before the new 9-3 arrives) I would:

  1. Use a 4 cylinder 9-5 (I would prefer the new BMW engine but the GM based engine is OK).
  2. E-85 capable if possible
  3. Tuned by Hirsch for more power and torque.( Maybe some other unique engine upgrades that may be filtering down to series production later)
  4. Interior upgraded, probably use Hirsch stuff, with maybe some unique touches for this model. This would include the seats also.
  5. Hi-per strut front suspension and upgraded rear suspension. Hirsch suspension tuning
  6. Upgraded brakes (current Saab accessory or Hirsch)
  7. Hirsch or upgraded wheels.
  8. Unique color choices. Not really expensive to do.
  9. Exterior gingerbread/upgrades. Spoilers, mirrors, fascia changes.
  10. AWD but with the new electric rear axle. First car to get it–showcases the technology.
  11. Need to upgrade the transmission. Might need to be an automatic due to item #10. Saab is already working on this I’m sure. This is the one area not much info is known about yet.

So what do we have? A cost-effective and unique SAAB with all the traditional Saab characteristics or safety, handling, performance and fuel economy. This model would showcase Saab’s new technology they have already invested capital into. The price would be acceptable. Fuel economy would be excellent. Performance would be excellent with the extra torque provided by the new electric rear axle. You have a unique SAAB much in the same tradition the Viggen was.

This car should be able to meet the upcoming emission and fuel economy requirements that are forthcoming worldwide for the next several years. The German’s are heading to responsible performance with smaller engines, turbos, etc—this is Saab’s answer!

Quick to market, cost effective, and so SAAB. Showcasing their technology and core competencies (couldn’t resist the MBA term).

Alan

P.S. If we want to wait a little bit longer, this would also work with the new 9-3.

Jeff
Guest
Jeff
5 years 7 months ago

Reasonable but I’m not sure about a few points-

3. Upgrading the 4-cyl yields 260HP, correct? How high could this engine go without blowing emissions? How much does it cost to certify it? More than the profit for developing it?

10. While I’d like to believe the new eAAM axle is ready for primetime, something tells me it needs a lot more time in the oven to be ready for mass production.

Warren B. Munger
Guest
Warren B. Munger
5 years 7 months ago

The 2.0 liter engine is easily capable of 260 horsepower and 295 ft-lbs of torque. This is what the new Buick Regal GS will obtain with this engine. The eAAM axle will supplement the engine as needed, with instantaneous torque. The will be plenty of torque to match a a typical 350 HP engine. I know we are now mixing units of measure but torque is what we want..

Jeff
Guest
Jeff
5 years 7 months ago

Sounds good to me. Is anyone familiar with how the certification process works if Saab used the exact engine/exhaust system out of the Buick? Do they need to recertify the exact same setup? Seems silly (but probable). Would be a great way to keep costs down.

74stingray
Guest
74stingray
5 years 7 months ago

I don’t see why it would need to be certified again in its entirety… maybe a “fee” and away it goes.

Red J
Guest
5 years 7 months ago

Jeff the certification is car dependent, not only because of the exhaust system, but because of car characteristics like weight or drag.
I don’t know how it is in the US but in Europe (AFAIK) every single car/engine combination has to be certified.

74stingray
Guest
74stingray
5 years 7 months ago

I like this since it uses a lot of “off the shelf” items to keep cost down.
Sourcing to Hirsch just comes naturally, but for some it may fall short on not being “halo” enough…

Again, great work on just submitting a proposal… It cannot be easy to sit and watch as other pick apart your work.

Warren B. Munger
Guest
Warren B. Munger
5 years 7 months ago

When we get done playing the halo game, then we can attack something Saab has to address—weight reduction

http://www.fourtitude.com/news/publish/Features/article_5321.shtml

V-8s are dying in the U.S. (check the current sales breakdown by engine type) slowly but surely. Fuel economy is becoming more important. Four cylinders is enough with electrical assist–plenty fast with good economy.

PT
Guest
PT
5 years 7 months ago

Nice try Alan. I like a lot about your proposal e xcept that I’d go for either the 93 with 4cyl or 95 with 6. Otherwise, the use of off-the shelf materials and options is a no-brainer. However, the question is – would it be special enough? Its pretty close to what a motivated buyer could already do.

Jim
Guest
Jim
5 years 7 months ago

The electric RWD is definitely a good solution. Much of the AWD demand is about getting up one’s driveway. Electric RWD provides that, without the many other disadvantages of AWD.

OddJob
Guest
OddJob
5 years 7 months ago

The Saab 4-cylinder is a detuned version of the 260 hp engine in Pontiac Solstice/Opel GT. There are software upgrades at bsr that takes it up to 312 hp/439 Nm (324 lb ft). This engine has potential.

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