Comment on SvD-SU style

If looking at the very top of comments to the original SvD article regarding the Swedish Ambassador in China and his report, you will find a comment from SU reader and commenter LasseS or Lars as his real name is.
The comment pretty much sums up all the questions that I have regarding everything Saab-China-Russia and The Swedish Government. And I like Lars would like some answers.

The original article here (In swedish)
And the take on the article so promptly reported on by TimR earlier today here
Lasses comment after the jump

I wonder what responsibilities the Swedish Embassy in Beijing has?
Is it really an embassytask to examine Swedish company’s business partners? Should politics control the dealings of Private businesses? And if so, on what basis and with what purpose? Is it to promote promote international investment, or to complicate them?

One can imagine a stateeconomy. But after all I know Sweden as a market economy. Strange that this conservative government meddles in so much of all things Saab. If the market is supposed to solve their own problems, which the government claims is their standpoint, why do they then try and prevent Russian and Chinese companies investing their money in the Saab? On the one hand, they are passive and cautious and do not want to help the industry, on the other hand, behave just like a old mercantilists.

It is neither not clear what they are really out to achieve. The fact is that they review these foreign companies and their representatives much harder than Swedish or Western ditos. They would have to  have good reason to do so. They do not examine their financial muscle but instead examine their “reputation”. It examines in detail the persons involved, personal relationships in a way which cross the boundary to the private sphere. To test their “genuine interest” in Saab in a tougher way than it does to people who are looking for Swedish citizenship.

But they gives no information on values ​​you really stand for and what should be the aim with this all. What criteria other than financial criteria will actually be met in order to invest in Saab? Are you supposed to be a Swedish, or at least a western company to gain access? And what is so much better with an American business than the Russian or Chinese? What are one looking for if one examines the personal relationships and interests? Do they want to promote Swedish or Western values ​​abroad?

Do we not want to let in foreign culture in Sweden?

Mr Reinfeldt, I ask for a clarification!

 

I concur with Lars. Please speak out

Thanks to Lars (LasseS) for letting us use your comment on SU

paddan
Member
5 years 4 months ago

Well stated. I hope this is not another foot dragging experience for VM like the EIB.

rostnes
Member
5 years 4 months ago

Oh my god, I´m really tired of swedish journalists and politicians who seem to wanna destroy every chans for SAAB to survive and develope new contacts. Was it like this when Geely bought Volvo, or when Sony picked up Ericsson mobile phones.
I have just about had it now!

johan
Member
5 years 4 months ago

Just a parenthesis, but Sony didn´t “pick up” Ericsson mobile phones. Sony and Ericsson formed a new company – Sony Ericsson – in which they own 50 percent each.

rostnes
Member
5 years 4 months ago
Yeah, but the swedish goverment and media did´nt make a big fuzz about it, did they! We have heard earlier, What is good for Volvo, is good for sweden! What about the other way around? No one seem to understand, that if whe stall all attempts for Saab to move on, it all ends up costing the taxpayers money! And the funny thing is, in almost all articles there seem to be a major issue that Saab is run as a private company, and must not cost the taxpayers anything. And in the next sentence, everyone seem to wanna stop… Read more »
peeceepeh
Member
5 years 4 months ago

The German wikipedia has a list of car models made by Hawtai over the years:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawtai

That’s quite a list for a “very young car company” (as SvD puts it), I’d say.

Teme1001
Member
5 years 4 months ago

“Die meisten davon sind allerdings Importmodelle.=> Most of them are, however, import models.”

Hyundai has built most of the cars, not Hawtai.

900pur
Member
5 years 4 months ago

One of the conditions of the EIB loan given to Saab is a control of the Saab owner structure. The EIB and the Swedish Government will gather information on Hawtai the same way it does with V. Antonov.
I think, most of us heard of Hawtai yesterday for the very first time, so we should not be too fast in defending or accusing them. More research has to be done.
In general, it is absolutely right, that VM is in search for a strong investor in China. VA won’t do it alone.

Peter, Sweden
Member
5 years 4 months ago

I kind of agree, but the annoying thing is that both the swedish government and the EIB acts af if they suspect that VM, VA or even JAJ are hiding something, or are being lousy businessmen. It is one thing to chech that there is nothing illegal going on, but regarding everything else (economy, patents, technology-sharing etc) the government and EIB must trust Saab’s management.

To control an owner structure of a company isn’t the same thing as controlling the company itself. When will the Swedish government get that?

kochje
Member
5 years 4 months ago

+1

meccano
Member
5 years 4 months ago
Concerning, but only slightly. Look, Hawtai either has the cash or it doesn’t. If the check clears, then all is well. Clearly they are a young company and they are in need of other more established companies to help them do business as they have done with Hyundai in the past and now with SAAB in the near future. The fact that Hawtai needs an established partner is good for SAAB because it would give SAAB the opportunity to continue, grow and flourish. A win-win in my book! Onward and upward to the start of production on the 9-5 SportCombi… Read more »
wpDiscuz