A good reason to carry a fire extinguisher

Yesterday our dear friend from France, Jeff  Golfhunter, nearly lost his prized Saab 95 V4.
In the afternoon while driving on the motorway in his beloved Saab the carburator decided to have a fire and without the fire extinguisher, which is always on board, his dear Titine would have gone up in smoke.

So never forget to take your fire extinguisher when you travel.

A few more pictures after the jump.

 

 

 

 

900 classic cab
Guest
5 years 1 month ago

Could be a lot worst…
I lost the habit of carrying one, because now I drive diesel :0

Henrik B.
Member
5 years 1 month ago

One word of adwise tho’: Never – as in this case – use a powder extinguisher! The micro-fine powder gets in everywhere, which in a reasonable short time, makes any eletrical cord, connector a.s.o. corrode, as moisture build up in the powder. So you’ll experience bad connections, periodical errors and so forth…
As a fireman once said to me: “If my car catches fire once, and someone rushes to my aid – with a powder extinguisher – I’ll stop him, and let the car burn…

Cheers!

maanders
Member
5 years 1 month ago

What is recommended then? It seems like most of the small B&C rated extinguishers I have seen use powder.

coggs
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Inergen or FM-200 have replaced Halon as legal / effective agents which will not damage electrical components or leave a residue. But are very pricy and you need a lot more agent (hence larger canister) than dry chemical. I don’t buy the “let it burn” if all you have is dry chemical. That’s what I have and would use should I have to. Just trying to figure out how I’d open the little hood hatch on my Sonett to get at an engine fire. Don’t have much time with that FRP body!

maanders
Member
5 years 1 month ago

That’s exactly what I was thinking, coggs! Considering a large extinguisher canister would not fit behind the seat on my Sonett III, I can live with using the dry chemical canister in the emergency case of a fire, but yes, I guess the best way to open the hood would be to pull the handle to release the hood and then use a stick or rod to push against the latch. Still a bit awkward when time is of the essence!

gunteman
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Always equip your car with a powder extinguisher! If you have room for another extinguisher, and the presence of mind to select the correct one when the fire rages, add a foam and/or CO2 extinguisher.

I’d rather decontaminate than decommission my car.

golfhunter
Member
5 years 1 month ago

+1

golfhunter
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Hej Henrik , honestly I couldn’t stand the arms crossed watching my 95 burning . I hope that your fireman was wrong . We’ll see . But the car is still there . And it’s important for me .

coggs
Member
5 years 1 month ago
A fire exstinguisher was the first thing I installed in my Sonett when I bought it last year. Another recommendation for vintage cars is a simple battery isolation switch. I also own a 1967 MGB GT and they have been known to spontaneously combust due to ground shorts. Being British I could just blame it on Lucus electronics (“No proper gentleman motors after dark” Joseph Lucas) but last thing I wanted was to have a car go up in flames just sitting there – especially since it resides in the basement of my house a fair amount of the time.
Khrisdk
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Just have to sneak this in as I have had the pleasure of owning a couple of British Motorcycles:

Why do the English drink warm beer?
Lucas makes the refrigerators.

Recommended procedure before taking on a repair of Lucas equipment: check the position of the stars, kill a chicken and walk three times sunwise around your car chanting: “Oh mighty Prince of Darkness protect your unworthy servant.”

;-)..sorry

And the fire exstinguisher will never loose its place in my car

coggs
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Three postion Lucas switch settings:
SMOKE, SMOLDER and IGNITE.

Also the inventor of the original intermitant wiper and self dimming dome light.

Easy to pick on Lucas, but LBCs (little British cars) are fun to drive, easy/affordable to work on, and most parts readily available. I think I could build a new MGB from scratch with aftermarket parts.

Khrisdk
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Agreed
Same thing goes for British bikes.
And they have the advantage of allowing you to forget all about correct torque on assembly.
Just give it all you have or it WILL fall off.
On the other hand you probably have lost all feling in your hands while driving.

Love them 😉

Much nicer than that “Most costeffective way of turning Gas into Noise without the dangerous sideeffect of Horsepower ” thing called Harley Davidson

Tripod
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Ah, the Prince of Darkness and British cars & bikes. 🙂 Love ’em. As you gentlemen show, one can have fun just talking about them. 😀

Sad to hear about Golfhunter’s car.

golfhunter
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Thanx Tripod

saabyurk
Member
5 years 1 month ago

I’m betting it was a loose pressed-in fitting in a FoMoCo carb. I read about them working loose all the time on Yahoo’s vSAAB forum.

Mailr
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Yes, especially the incoming fuel tube, probably due to he pressure combined with temperature creepage. That or a failed membrane on the accelerator (?) pump. I have seen both problems more than once, and both result in fuel floating around on top of the motor. Hard to prevent, you need to inspect (and fix) regulary.

BoeBoe
Member
5 years 1 month ago

This looks familiar… (repost?)

Khrisdk
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Que?

BoeBoe
Member
5 years 1 month ago

This article was also posted there yesterdag or Saturday. Saw it in my G Reader stream.

Khrisdk
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Then I think your reader was wrong

BoeBoe
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Nope, it wasn’t. See comments below…

golfhunter
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Thank you Robin for your article . And for all the messages of sympathy I’ve received .I’ll do my best to restore my dear Titine

pierre
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Ne vous inquietez pas. Your engine bay would look exactly the same if you had been in a dusty rally–une Saab a l’habitude de ceci. Nettoyez. Lavez. Reparez. C’est fini. Pas de probleme.

retired saab
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Paris-Dakar, ou le feu… meme chose!

golfhunter
Member
5 years 1 month ago

Oui je reste confiant .Merci pour tes encouragements .

akis96
Member
5 years 1 month ago

The powder in powder fire extinguishers is basically salt. Unfortunatelly this powder goes everywhere and can not be washed away with water. If not cleaned (by brush) the salt though draws water from the air and the car will start to rust. The powder is extremely bad to aluminum motor-blocks.
Solution: Foam extinguishers like http://www.prymos.com – small but strong and easy to use.
Those carry the GS sign and have been reported in various oldtimer-magazines. I have them in my Saab 9000 & my Saab 96. The foam also can be sprayed directly on burning persons without making things worse.

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