Positive vibes about Nevs in Dagens Industri

di_rgb_400x400The Swedish financial newspaper Dagens Industri (the Daily Industry) have today posted two positive and interesting articles on the car company from Trollhättan now known as Nevs. Considering how Saab was treated by Swedish media many times, this is really nice to see.

The first article “Planen som ska få Nevs på rull” (the plan that will get Nevs rolling) starts out explaining that the Saab branding on the Stallbacka plant is gone and the production has stopped, with another negative fiscal year to be expected for Nevs.

DI asks “how can Nevs employ 900 people and keep growing?”.

Today Nevs has 900 employees in Trollhättan, with 230 consultants as well. They’re still recruiting more people, mainly engineers within electronics and software. This year the personell cost is expected to reach 500 million SEK ($56 million USD) and it’s all currently funded by the owners of Nevs.

The new factory in Tianjin, China will be ready next year. In order to get the necessary license for EV car production in China, it will be a complete car plant. This factory will produce the Nevs 9-3, based on the Saab NG9-3. The Stallbacka plant will support the Chinese factory and the next generation of Nevs EV cars for Europe will be built in Trollhättan.

IMG_3661

Nevs does have some funding of their own, with the development of the new Turkish car and the contract for 150 000 cars and 100 000 vehicles with Panda New Energy in China. The vehicles are electric vans that will be delivered through the New Long Mas plant in Fujian, China, where Nevs are part owners.

The article goes on explaining how Nevs are working on a new and modular platform (Phoenix 3.0) for their next generation of EV cars. Nevs are attracting competent people, not only from the car industry.

Christian Bromander, head of electric and mechanical architecture at Nevs, with 25 years of experience from the car industry, says “Nevs are thinking outside of the box, with people from outside of the industry we are challenged to think in new ways.”.

Michèl Annink, with a background from Salesforce, Microsoft and Toshiba, says “Nevs is not a traditional car producer. I don’t think about the fact that we don’t produce cars right now. We are currently developing virtual services.”.

This article finishes off stating 2020 as the year when the next generation of NEVS EV cars will be released. By then the traditional car producers will have a number of EV cars out as well. In contrast to this, Nevs CEO Mattias Bergman says “With all due respect to their resources, they can’t focus on EV cars only. We have knowledge of the past, but we aren’t stuck there.”.

The second article from Dagens Industri “Utvecklar bil för Turkiet” (developing a car for Turkey) covers the development of the new Turkish car by Nevs. Frank Smit is responsible for this project and he has been working with Saab since 2002, with a previous past from Nissan, Mitsubishi and Hyundai.

Frank Smit is calm, even though not everything always goes according to plan. 140 employees at Nevs in Trollhättan are working on the Turkish car, with 40 people from Tübitak, the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. The car is supposed to “breath and feel Turkish”, so it’s important to work with people who know this country.

The Turkish 9-3 will also be an EV car, based on Saab NG9-3. It will probably be produced in Turkey. These cars will primarily be company cars and used in car-sharing services, which means that they will be in use more than the average (private) car. This is a challenge, when it comes to the battery range and pricing of the cars. The range of the Nevs 9-3 is at least 300 km (186 US miles).

Finishing this off, these two articles doesn’t really add anything new but they do have a positive vibe about Nevs. It’s nice to see that, even though they’re not actually producing cars, they’re still busy working and employing more than 900 people in Trollhättan.

I personally appreciate that Nevs are thinking in new ways, like no other car company. This is exactly what Saab did. Saab was the quirky, special and unique car company from Trollhättan. Let’s not forget that.

Romac
Member

Great to hear some news, especially positive-sounding news!

Member

Sounds encouraging!
As for the 2020 Phoenix cars.
Just copy and paste this design, and I Will be the first to place an order.
http://www.saabplanet.com/saab-9-3-from-the-future/

It doesn’t matter if the four letters says NEVS…
THAT is a SAAB, no matter how you look at it:)

H
Member

News about SAAB … sorry, NEVS (whatever) … written in a positive manner in public Swedish press. That was a long time ago! Let’s hope it’s the start of a new trend!

Angelo V.
Member

My guess is, like many Chinese ventures, the object at this point is to secure the technology and know how and eventually, transfer all operations to China. Interesting that a factory in Sweden is in mothballs, but they are apparently steaming ahead at breakneck speed to get a Chinese factory up and running to build these cars.

Tjalle
Guest

They are not only building a complete factory – they are also building a Product Development Center.

Dagen Runt
Member

To me it sounds less positive than it did a few months ago. Suddenly it turns out NEVS has no permit to sell cars in China, the 9-3 is postponed another year, and the plant in Trollhättan will remain pretty idle as a production site. And if government subsidization of new energy vehicles is being gradually decreased in China, there’s another hurdle for a low volume manufacturer to overcome on their way to the market – once they get the permit to begin with. Tough going, and as unpredictable as ever.

3cyl
Member

$56 million annual operating costs and no product. This is either an entity with capital investors who are very confident in the long range plan (if that is the case I hope the are correct) or a money laundering scheme of some sort.

Jacko
Member

Any news when they’re gonna release those 4 new models we’ve seen some time ago? I’m thinking about purchasing Tesla model 3 once it’s available for sale and I’d like to compare it to Nevs cars, but these new ones, not electric 9-3.

Angelo V.
Member
Jacko: Are you being sarcastic? Me thinks so. And is there any “good news” here for fans of Saab? Me thinks not really. NEVS won’t ever be producing Saabs. You wanna know what “good news” is? If you’re a fan of KIA/Hyundai, good news is the new Kia Sportage. In fact, good news is almost anything in their line-up—-hot hatches, SUVs, sedans, hybrids, etc. Good news is the new “Genesis” division, making a very handsome and capable luxury car. A new division. They talked about it a few years ago, and delivered it this year. Gorgeous car. Dealerships. Promoting it… Read more »
3cyl
Member
Angelo, I was in a new KIA Optima turbo recently. I suppose it is a good package, but I immediately noticed that compared to my 9-5 the seating position was closer to the floor and the windshield was less vertical and sloped further away from the driver creating a bit of pillbox effect for outward vision. This is an area where SAAB differentiated itself from other sedans in a positive way(although less so in the NG 9-3). Also, the Optima does not offer a manual transmission in the turbo version. So, KIA is competitive in the quest for a nice… Read more »
Angelo V.
Member
I don’t disagree with that at all. But my point is that this company—-these companies—-set goals and achieve them. I’m not comparing the Optima to Saabs we own and love. I’m comparing competent, well funded companies with strong management to NEVS. And the comparison shows that when some companies set out to do something, they deliver in a big way. NEVS took over the Saab assets in 2012. This is now going on 5 years since they came in talking big. They’ve delivered next to nothing—a string of broken promises or lies, no products for sale, no renderings of products… Read more »
3cyl
Member
Well it is obvious that they have a different plan from what you feel common sense would dictate. It is interesting that NEVS investors are willing to spend what is not a negligible amount of money each year (even if negligible by industry standards) while waiting for some future return. It is natural to assume that the purpose of a company is to make money, but in NEVS’ case it is possible to wonder if something else is taking place (see my post earlier in this thread) Nonetheless, they employ a lot of professional people and apparently make payroll as… Read more »
Jacko
Member
Hey Angelo, Nope, I’m not joking, I’m quite curious what those new Nevs cars are going to be. I just moved to Oslo, Norway, and EVs are very popular here – I can see Tesla model S every 5 minutes while I’m driving my 9-5. Charging stations are everywhere, you don’t have to pay for public car parks, you don’t have to pay tolls (I’m crossing 3 of them on my way to work, they’re all over the place) and you can legally drive on a bus and taxi lanes. So my next car will be EV, Tesla model S… Read more »
Romac
Member

Meanwhile, others are not standing still… …witness LYNK & CO’s 01 SUV plans

Angelo V.
Member
Romac: Of course not. Big, well funded, serious concerns don’t handle an acquisition as feebly as NEVS did. Doesn’t matter if it’s acquiring a thriving company or a carcass—-companies with vision, ambition, skill-set—-take over, hit the ground running and make things happen—-sooner rather than later. The fact that we’ll be five years in with virtually nothing to show for this speaks volumes. Honestly, anyone else who showed a lick of interest—Mahindra, Youngman, Brightwell Holdings—-any of them—-would have likely done more by now than NEVS has done. Then again, a group of high school kids who met in shop class would… Read more »
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