• In reply to: View

    A warehouse may be the only way to go, but it doesn’t bode well for resuming production. Idle machinery usually becomes junk. It costs money to maintain equipment even when it is not in use and when an owner is struggling financially maintenance is commonly put off. Also, as time goes on, state-of-the-art assembly lines become less so.

  • In reply to: View

    “Question is, is there a demand in Europe for the products that Mahindra or Dong Feng offers?…”

    Mahindra makes a model called the Alfa. They undoubtedly would have to rename it for sale in Europe, but it appears to be just the vehicle for those legions of buyers looking to drive something that has no chance of associating them with the…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    BMW bikes seem to be going the way of their cars. Performance and the associated complexity seem to be dominating their new bike designs as evidenced by the introduction of limited water cooling on the opposed twins. I guess this is necessary to achieve more power, but BMW already has a line of fours with leading edge performance as well as…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    Joe, all I’m suggesting as far as Fiat is concerned is that they may be better off selling Alfas as SAABs in the US. Rebuilding the SAAB brand in that scenario would probably have been much easier than resurrecting Alfa here (which apparently Fiat is in the process of attempting).

  • In reply to: View

    Joe, I wonder if a Company will want to build cars that appeal to the traditional SAAB buyer anyway. It hasn’t proven to be an especially lucrative market over time.

  • In reply to: View

    Fiat already has Alfa but as far as the US market goes Fiat could probably do better selling SAAB versions of Alfas than the Alfas themselves. Also, a SAAB Abarth might be more likely to be price accepted by consumers than the Fiat version. The results may not be what we want, but it might work for both Fiat and the SAAB brand. I doubt Fiat is…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    Financially, it makes sense to hold onto SAABs we still like. Something that at this point isn’t valued very high can’t drop much in value and those of us who don’t see anything we would prefer to own over our SAABs can use the funds that would go toward a new car we don’t really want anyway for something else. Nonetheless, I could decide to or…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    At this point I’ll stick with my Dame Edna SAAB. From a financial perspective the parts risk may or may not affect me soon and is limited by the depreciated value of the car, whereas the significant depreciation loss on a new car is a sure thing. However, many of us will probably reach a point where we want new before a next generation of SAABs…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    Being slow to the table with AWD was a disaster. SAAB had the image of a premier snowbelt car, but when other brands began offering AWD that image melted. There is nothing wrong with FWD but a lot of SAAB’s former market went with brands offering AWD.

  • 3cyl commented on the post, Plan B, my thoughts. 1 week ago

    In reply to: View

    Decades of struggle may be an indication that the task of making SAAB viable is more difficult than putting a man on the moon. At this point it is surprising that anyone is interested in attempting it. It probably wouldn’t take any longer to establish a new brand.

  • In reply to: View

    The SAAB name may not be all that important if a profit horizon of 10 years is about what a company considering a new brand would expect.

  • In reply to: View

    A clean two stroke! We old timers would have to add some blue dye to the fuel to create the proper exhaust cloud if such an engine were to be used by SAAB.

  • In reply to: View

    And they were more distinctive i.e not every Archer, Angelo and Dave had one.

  • In reply to: View

    Ronnie, the assets may be reported as 3x the debts, but those assets are reported at book value. The realizable value of those assets could be a fraction of that. For instance, over 1/3 of those assets are intangible. When other assets classes are appropriately discounted it is unlikely that there is any asset value of note (if any) in excess…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    More likely the low production volume would have offset any savings in deveopment costs requiring a price at least as high as that of more modern designs. Either that or sell at a loss – a good strategy for an owner who wants to get SAABs on the road with no regard to what it costs to accomplish those sales. This was evident in the petrol cars…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    The 9-3 didn’t sell well enough in its heyday and even then there were substantial discounts. It is not going to sell well enough now. The cost to build this old design in low numbers is at best about the same as or more likely even greater than the cost to build something more up to date. There may be interested buyers, but because of the…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    At this point, the potential to make money here is so far out in time that it could be argued that a benefactor is exactly what is needed. Someone with near unlimited resources who is willing to spend money on something they want to support rather than for the purpose of profit. This latest announcement from NEVS may be evidence that NEVS has…[Read more]

  • In reply to: View

    I can’t say what it will take to make a real SAAB, but if something comes out of all of this we’ll know whether it is or isn’t.

  • In reply to: View

    Very nice post.

  • In reply to: View

    Last I read Subaru’s big problem is trying to make enough cars to keep product on dealer lots.

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