Restoration of 1987 900T16 Cab

DSC_0160Here are two of my SAAB’s in sunny weather at my summer house.

I bought the Cab last autumn in Malmo and drove it to my summer-house in south-west of Sweden, in the belief that I had a car for the summer season 2016. It was not passing the MOT this spring – because of rusty floors. When uncovering the metal from the inside, I realized that I had a big job waiting in replacing the rusty floor panes. I have bought another (cheap) 900 with fine floors which I will “move” to the cab. Another project was to get all the vacuum controlled devices work. After replacing about 6m of vacuum rubber tubes, things started to work again – even the cruise control! The soft top and the rear window has to be replaced – it has probably been replaced some years ago by a non-professionel person, bad workmanship. The rear window lifts are not working – no 12V supply to the switches, even though the front lifts work (same fuse).

These cabs (900OG) seems to increase in value these days since they are approaching the magic age of 30 years. SAAB enthusiasts do everything to keep SAAB’s running! That’s the good reason why I want to save this Cab.

So far my SAAB’s are: 1987 900T16Cab, 1972 96 (newly restored by me), 1997 9000CSE and my daily car 2011 9-5 NG. I will keep you posted as the Cab restoration proceeds.

UPDATE 1:

There has been a winter in between since I last updated my report. During this time I have got a garage close to my summer house to remove and repair all the rusty panels in my car. Because of a leaking soft top, the floor has acted like a bath tub over some time. Since the floor mats are a noise cancelling type with foam on the underside, they have soaked up the water and kept it there – letting the rust eating up the floor pans. So all 4 floor pans had to be replaced. In addition there was rust on the inner front wings, down at the rear side. These are also repaired. I had to replace the windshield because of a severe crack. When we removed the glass, we found no steel to fix the glue on for the new windshield. The lower right and left corners were completely rusted. Soft as a biscuit. The garage made new replacement parts by hand. Fantastic good work.  The last issue was the left door. The paint looked like the surface of an orange. The paint shop grinded it to bare metal, applied a type of etching primer, and painted it black together with the windshield frame. THEN we could install the new windshield.

During the work, the steering rack started to leak oil – probably because of dry gaskets. A refurbished rack was supplied and we replaced the old one. The last issue was crack in the engine oil sump close to the drain screw. This is a common issue if the drain plug has not been changed, not used the right copper washer or used too high torque to tighten the screw. We managed to fix it by: First drain the oil. Pump cleaning fluid through the dip-stick tube and clean the inside as much as possible. Get the cleaning fluid out by using pressurized air. Let it dry over a week-end. Then grind the outside to a rough surface, and end the process by applying chemical metal around the drain screw where the crack was. The oil change has from now on to be done by using a vacuum unit to suck out the oil through the dip-stick tube.

Now I have to go to “Besikta” (Swedich MOT). I am really looking forward to get the car on the road.

Last expensive project is to change the soft top with one that is not letting the rain into the car.

UPDATE 2:

Last issue before the MOT, is to change the generator. It is dead, no charge at all. Tried to replace the regulator, but it did not cure the fault. BDS managed to get a refurbished generator within 24h. Good service!

The MOT is over. The car passed the exam! My wife and I celebrated by having a long ride with the top down in the sunny weather.

The next important task is to replace the soft top. This will probably be done in Denmark, both because of price and response from the workshop.

Then I have to repair the quarter- windows. They are stuck in the top position. After all it is a hobby – no hurry:)

Jonathan
Member

Great post Tore, thanks for sharing this! Looking forward to reading more about the restoration of your Saab 900 convertible. 🙂

Monique Hubrechts
Guest
Monique Hubrechts

Nice pictures. Nice hobby in your summer house . Whether or not its about money just enjoy it and take your time but longer than Nevs trying to produce something that looks like a saab car having no turbo but electric powered propulsion. Who Knows that car will find a place in your summer house.

kochje
Member

Tore, am interested to hear how you got your Speed control working again. I do have exactly the same car from also that same year and everything is perfect except the Cruise control. They told me it is quite some work to repair it; is that true?

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