Cracked Leather Seats

I remember a discussion here at SU about the contrasting leather in the OG 9-5 seats was not real leather, but vinyl. This is something that got very real to me 2015. I generally take good care of my car, but I have not done much to the seats. I like to think that leather seats get a nice patina over time, if it is real leather, that is.

Summer 2015 the light colored fake leather in my driver seat cracked. I thought it was a shame, since my car is in good condition. I decided to mend it. I looked around the internet and found a solution called “Color Glo”. Color Glo is specialized in fixing damages in both real leather and vinyl. They can also imprint different leather patterns to mimic the original look.

It turned out that cracked fake leather on Saabs was quite common and that the rip could not be too large in order to fix it. Mine was ok to mend. Unfortunately, the leather pattern could not be imprinted because the cushion beneath the rip was too compressed (gap between the cushion and the vinyl). It seems that the cushions gets worn quite fast.

My driver seat before mending the cracked vinyl.

The mending looked ok, but not by any means perfect. Still, the seat was in once piece again. The mending got lightly tainted by my blue jeans quite fast.

Just before this summer, a piece came off the mending and I am back to square one again. It seems that it is not possible to get a permanent solution for this issue. At least not with the method I chose.

The current state of my seat.

I think Tim mentioned that if you chose the all black version of the seat, you got all real leather. That was probably the correct choice to make. I also discussed this matter with my previous boss who used to be employed at Saab. He said that Saab had pure leather all over the seats for a long time. In competition, Saab was the only one to keep leather all over and scaled down to specific parts of the seat to keep price on par with competition.

Has anyone tried any other method? Please write a post and share your experience!

Auto-dimming rearview side mirrors back in stock!

Many of us have been waiting to replace brownish auto-dimming rearview side mirrors for a long while now, as described in this post by Tim. The problem has concerned both 9-3 and 9-5 owners.

Recently this issue has been solved. According to Viktor Karlsson, Product Marketing Manager / Global Marketing at Orio, auto-dimming rearview side mirrors are now available on all markets. It is a long term solution with secured supply over time.

SideMirror

A MY10 mirror glass (pos11) is combined with a frame (pos5) and a cover (pos10). Parts information has been sent to all retailers. A new mirror will work fine with an older one, if you only need to replace one.

The drawback with this solution is that you need to get the new cover painted.

Saab Insurance – Swedish Market

logo-insuranceSince there are no Saabs manufactured for the moment, some of us cling on to what we have. That´s all right, since  a well treated Saab will run for a long time. However, there are some issues when a car come of age. One is insurance.

Most car insurances have a limit for covering repairs on the engine/machine. There is a big range here. A common limit is at a maximum of 8 years or 100´000 km. Some insurance companies stretch this up to 120´000 km or even higher in some cases. Note that the deductible may raise considerably when the car gets older (check the conditions).

There are many comparison sites in Sweden which can be used to compare car insurances. Usually you need to do some digging into the fine print to understand the limits for engine/machine damage. If this is important to you, I suggest you do. If you want objective comparison I recommend “Konsumenternas Försäkringsbyrå”. Follow this link to compare:

http://www.konsumenternas.se/forsakring/olika-forsakringar/bilforsakringar/jamfor-bilforsakringar

Note that this site only compare the content  of the insurance, not how well the insurance company actually perform at the event of an issue (except if there is a quality index). I made a call to “Konsumenternas Försäkringsbyrå”  in order to check about some of the companies with very good conditions and a very low price. Smaller, newer insurance companies have deals with subcontractors to manage the issues and they do not have a good reputation. You may also need to go to specific repair shops. If you stick with the larger companies there will be no issues getting a damage inspected or finding good repair shop. In the end, you get what you pay for.

Folksam, (one of the large insurance companies in Sweden) offer a special insurance for Saab owners. It is a bit pricey, but it covers engine/machine repairs up to 150´000 km or 8 years (which is much better than their normal deal). The deductible is also very low. A bad thing is that they add a cost if you use the car for business trips, which is something I have never experienced before.

Folksam have undoubtedly  realized that Saabs are cars that last long so it’s worth the risk to give better conditions. They also realize that they will attract Saab owners who stick with their brand. I hope more insurance companies understand and do the same (e.g. the Saab Brand Insurance offered by IF).

Prices for car insurance differ a lot depending on where you live, what car you have, how old you are and a number of other criteria. Different companies will put you in different segments depending on their specific risk calculation. I would advise you all to check for better deals each year.

Drive safe and have a good vacation!

Greetings From Legoland, Denmark

I usually do some Saab-spotting while on the road on my vacation trips. This time, me and my family went down to Denmark to visit Legoland. All went well in spite of the horrors of parking my beloved Saab in the cramped ferry parking space, next to half drunk people with no sense opening car doors next to other cars.

I managed to do some proper Saab-spotting inside Legoland as well

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And finally a Volvo with some issues….

Rust Proofing a Saab 9-5

Tuff-Kote DinolMany of us wonder what to do when there are no new Saabs to buy for the moment. A lot of the comments on SU concern replacement options.  I did my homework and came up with the conclusion – I don’t want to replace my car, I love it!

I bought my car 2010, just after the new year. Saab was already in a shaky situation and I wanted to buy a car which would last a long time even if Saab would not make it as a company. I got hold of a 9-5 Griffin Vector Sport. It is basically an Aero, but with the 210hp 2.3l Bio Ethanol engine. It was less than one year old and was previously driven by a shop floor manager at Saab in Trollhättan.

I can’t really find any car with good value for money which is fun to drive, beautiful, eco friendly and can fit my entire family.

So how do you keep your darling in good shape? I decided to give it some TLC in form of some good old rust proofing. I have already applied paint protection and this was the natural next step.

I decided to go with Dintrol or Dinol as it is also called, after recommendations from a relative who has been in the business. Dinotrol is a rugged product with a deep penetration effect. The next step was to find a good workshop. There are several players in this field in the vicinity of Gothenburg where I live. I made my decision after talking to Ulf, a proper Saab nut like myself. Ulf has been a Saab mechanic since 1980 and has worked with Saab until he bought Protec. He has one 9-5 Aero and beautiful 9-3 convertible. This is a man who knows what he is talking about when it comes to Saab. Ulf promised that I could come by to document the different steps and that I could share the experience with the readers of SU.

The Tuff-Kote Dinol treatment is a thorough procedure which takes three days to complete.

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