SaabsUnited at the IAA

Hi,
in the next two days I will be at the IAA in Frankfurt. There will be no Saab booth inside of the motor-show and there won’t be no Saab convoy outside, but if you have interest in any non-Saab thing, I will try to make a couple of exclusive pictures for you.

I will only check the site one or two times per day, so please don’t get to impatient 😉

IAA Saab: Drivers Wanted From the Saab Community

The IAA is approaching and soon 15 new Saabs will be cruising through Frankfurt during Europe’s largest car show, waving the flag of our beloved Swedish car brand. Saab wants to thank their fans and is looking for driver(s) that will drive the community designed 9-5. Other cars in this small fleet will be the 9-5 SC and the 9-4x.

Saab is looking for someone, is it you? Do you want to spend a day with the Saab Germany crew? Is there anyone out there who wants to experience the thrill and innovation of Saab up close and cruise with us through the city of Frankfurt? If you are a passionate Saab fan, you should take the opportunity and apply now.

Read moreIAA Saab: Drivers Wanted From the Saab Community

IAA Saab convoy: Design a livery for a IAA Saab

Frankfurt in September, a city full of car crazy people from all over Europe, but no Saab at the IAA. However, few will notice it. Therefore Saab is planning to shows presence before the exhibition entrances, at the parking lots and on the Frankfurt hot spots.

During the motor show a convoy of 15 new Saabs will cruise twice a day for several hours through Frankfurt. The Saabs will be made ready next week and will get a flashy livery. Saab is giving the on-line community the possibility to help.

Read moreIAA Saab convoy: Design a livery for a IAA Saab

SaabsUnited and the IAA and other stories

When you have been one time in a motor show during the press days, you will never want to miss it again. It is not that it is only fun and lingonberry juice, but as this is more my hobby than a job, I enjoy every second I can be nearby a Saab car.

This said you can now imagine that I started planning my IAA visit on the trip home from the Geneva motor show.

Read moreSaabsUnited and the IAA and other stories

Part 3 – Interview with Simon Padian from Saab Design

A few weeks ago in Frankfurt, I was fortunate enough to sit down (in a Saab 9-3x) and have a good long chat with Simon Padian about all things to do with Saab Design. We covered a lot of different subjects over the course of around 45 minutes and this is the second part of that interview.
Part 1 is here.
Part 2 is here.
Simon Padian
Again, my thanks to Simon for the interview and insights. This is the final part in a three-part transcription.

——
Saabs United: What was the first Saab you ever drove?
Simon Padian: Let’s see…..the first Saab I ever drove?
SU: Was it prior to you starting with Saab?
SP: I don’t think I ever drove one before I started at Saab, no. I’d been in Saabs before I worked for them but I don’t think I’d ever driven one, thinking back. Or did I? Yes, yes I did. The first one I ever drove was a 99. It was about a year or 18 months before I came to work at Saab. I didn’t own it. It belonged to a friend, but that was the first one.
SU: Was it a turbo?
SP: No. It wasn’t.
SU: I’ve just bought one so I’ve got turbo fever.
SP: Inca wheels?
SU: Yeah, with a spare set of Incas to go with it.
SP: Fantastic!
A bit more crapping on from me about 99 Turbos……
SU: So, the 9-5…… We’ve heard the press talk, that’s it 80% Swedish. We’ve come to accept that it’s a conglomeration between Sweden and Germany, but what was the main focus of the Swedish work?
SP: Well we’ve been involved with the car right from the start, of course. The main focus for us, in location terms, was probably the interior. That was developed, physically, in Sweden. Bus as I said, we’ve been involved throughout the whole process. Being part of the GME (GM Europe) design organisation, and it’s been a large project, so [head of GME Design] Mark Adams has been the person overseeing the project in its entirety.
SU: Do you tend to put more emphasis, personally – whether it comes down to the ownership experience or driving experience or just getting attached to the car – do you tend to think more in terms of exterior or interior?

Read morePart 3 – Interview with Simon Padian from Saab Design

Part 2 – Interview with Simon Padian from Saab Design

A few weeks ago in Frankfurt, I was fortunate enough to sit down (in a Saab 9-3x) and have a good long chat with Simon Padian about all things to do with Saab Design. We covered a lot of different subjects over the course of around 45 minutes and this is the second part of that interview.
Part 1 is here.

Simon Padian
Again, my thanks to Simon for the interview and insights. This is part 2 of what will most likely be a three-part transcription.
——
Saabs United: Can you run us quickly – if it can be done quicky – through the design process? So for example, “we’ve going to build X class of car” – is that where it starts?
Simon Padian: The starting point is, I suppose, what we call the portfolio dicussions, it’s where we say “OK, what kind of cars are we going to need in X-number of years?” What kind of role they should have, what should it be built on? And obviously we’re involved at that point, because design’s all about looking ahead and we’ve obviously got a lot to say about that. So then when a car’s been identified and it’s like “OK, we’re going to do that kind of product” then you start looking at the architecture and there’s a lot of discussions backwards and forwards in terms of “well, from a design perspective, we want to reduce the front overhang as much as possible… we want to widen the track… we want to get the proportions right” because that’s the starting point, really, the proportions. Once you’ve locked in some of those parameters, then you’ve got to live with those proportions, basically. It’s very difficult to do a good design if you haven’t got good proportions. They’re the building blocks. If your overhang’s too long at the front and your track’s very narrow and it’s tall – it doesn’t matter how good the design is, it’s never going to look right. So you try and establish all those parts. There’s lots of discussion – detailed discussions around the architecture, the position of the windscreen, for example. We’re working a lot with engineering and what tends to happen is that you at least try and narrow it down to bandwidth. So there’s a little bit of freedom because of all the packaging and components…..
SU: …everything’s got to fit in….
SP: Yeah, everything’s got to work. So usually you can say, OK, the touch-down point for the windscreen, for example, that can come anywhere within, say, a 100mm bandwidth, and that way you know your limits in terms of how the design can be or where the surface is going to go. Things like roof height, we’re always trying to push the roof down, of course, because it makes the car look more dynamic, but you’ve got a limit to how low you can sit in the car, how much headroom you need so that people can fit in it. So all these kind of things. The biggest one at the moment, which is effecting everybody is the front end, in terms of the pedestrian protection. All the regulations are getting a lot tougher now….

Read morePart 2 – Interview with Simon Padian from Saab Design

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