Why Saab and Volvo won’t merge….

I can’t remember the site where I saw this, but I immediately threw up and then downloaded it for a rainy day.
saab-v70_2_sty.jpg
Actually, there is something appealing about the elongated body, but that mid section is more messed up than Britney Spears.
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And whilst I’m dealing with strange things, here’s something Robin M sent through from a past issue of Saab Scene magazine, in the UK:
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Ay Carumba!!!

On XWD/Diesel and the Saab 9-5x

One of the reasons it shouldn’t matter that there’s no XWD and diesel combination in the Saab 9-3x:
Saabwinterdrive.jpg
If you’ve been reading winter-related posts here and at Trollhattan Saab then you know that Saabs, either modern or older, tend to do just fine in the slippery stuff. The fact that XWD is available is pretty much a bonus, but I’d like to suggest that for 95% of people, a 2WD version of the 9-3x would probably be capable of handling everything they come across.
Of course, the reason Saab do need XWD on this car, and preferably with a diesel version, has been pointed out by Alex in a previous post on the issue – because the market says they need it, especially in Europe.
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So….the Saab 9-5x….
That’s a car we’ve never even heard of but it’s one that I’m sure is on it’s way. If it isn’t, then Saab would need to have their collective heads read.
A 9-5x would, of course, be to the 9-5 as the 9-3x is to the 9-3 range: a XWD-equipped and perhaps more rugged version of the base 2WD car.
The difference would be that the Epsilon II architecture that the 9-5 has been designed on is one that’s been developed with all-wheel-drive in mind from the get-go.
It’s also been developed with a variety of engines in mind, so the combination of diesel and XWD in a future Saab 9-5x shouldn’t be an issue at all.
The fact that you can’t get a diesel/XWD Saab 9-3x and the angst that that will cause for a few is an illustration of how much Saab ‘need’ the next generation Saab 9-5, and how much they will need it in as many flavours as possible.
Even if most people don’t ‘need’ an all-wheel-drive Saab at all.

New Saab 9-5 Spyshots

It’s certainly a busy weekend over at Auto Motor and Sport.
Yesterday it was naked 9-3x photos and today it’s more photos of the Saab 9-5 in winter testing northern Sweden. This vehicle is the one that’s actually registered as being a Holden, but don’t let that throw you off. It’s got a 180hp diesel and an automatic transmission.
Saab_9-5_MY2010_wintertest_03.jpg
Saab_9-5_MY2010_wintertest_06.jpg
There are six photos in all, and they’re all tree times the size of this one (or is that nine times the size? I get confused sometimes).
They’re all available over at Auto Motor and Sport.
Photoshop experts, feel free to do your thing……

Djup Strupe on the 2010 Saab 9-5 and Saab 9-4x

No pictures here, just some feedback I received from Djup Strupe on my post in anticipation of the next generation Saab 9-5.
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I was just reading your article about the reveal of the 9-5 and I thought I would drop you a quick email. I have had the pleasure of seeing the new 9-5 in the flesh, along with the 9-4 and the 9-3x.
I have to say I am very much biased as I have grown up with Saab and have a genuine love of the brand, but, I really think the new 9-5 is going to be a real success. The car looks fantastic, it is one of the best looking cars I have seen in the last 5 years. The car that I would compare it to in looks is the Jaguar XF, which is my currently my favourite new product on the market (a beautiful car).
Part of the reason why I think it is going to be a success is that there has been a real concentration on ensuring the right engines are available for the 9-5. A strong emphasis has been put on CO2, a key to the European market. In addition, it looks like it will be coming with the required accessories for a car in its class (it looks like HUD is on the way…woohoo!).
Just a little on the 9-4x, which is also a great looking vehicle. Its rear light cluster is stunning, and very different to anything on the market at the moment. The vehicle itself is far larger than I thought it would be, although it will only come in a 5 seater version (which hasn’t effected the X5). My fear with this car is that it is probably too late in coming to the market as the trend is now strongly moving away from SUVs and crossovers.
Still, it will provide Saab with more bullets in its arsenal. Never a bad thing.
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My thanks to Djup Strupe for chipping in. Despite the gloomy conditions around at the moment, I think there really is light at the end of the tunnel for Saab.

2009 Saab 9-5 Griffin – Sweden

I covered this in snippets last night, but have just received some more information about the 2009 Saab 9-5. Bottom Line: If you live in Sweden and want a 260hp Saab 9-5 – get in quick.
Please bear in mind that this is just for the Swedish market at the moment and may not be the case for other markets, but one of the headlines for 2009 is that the 260hp engine variant, and the Aero badge, are not options in Sweden for 2009. If you want a Saab 9-5 Aero with a 260hp engine, it looks like you’ll have to sift through 2008 model stocks
The Saab 9-5 will only be available in a special “Griffin Edition” and will come in two levels of trim only – Linear and Vector (with a sports variant available). The details I’ve received so far are as follows:

First week of November (week 45) Saab will start to manufacture an “enhanced” version of the Saab 9-5. It will be named Griffin.
The Griffin model has gone through a few careful design updates and it will have additional standard
equipment.
The Saab 9-5 will be available in two different versions, Linear Griffin and Vector Griffin. The Griffin models will be open for order 1st of October. And will replace all existing 9-5 models.
Exterior changes:
* Aero rear bumper including spoiler.
* The finish on the metallic frames on the headlight grill will be more like the 9-3 (not so shiny)
* New contrasting seams on handbrake and gear stick
* SPA (parking sensors standard)
* Front foglights standard
* Linear Griffin will have tinted metallic inserts on doors etc.
* On Griffin Vector Bi-xenon is standard, rain sensor, ALU63 rim (Aero MY08).
You canʼt order anymore Aeros, no 2.3t biopower as an Aero model, and there’s no 260hp engine. The following engine options are available for both the Linear and Vector trim levels.
2.0t (150hp)
2.0t BioPower (180hp)
2.3t BioPOwer (210hp)
1.9 TiD (150hp)
1.9 TiD HP (175hp)
Prices will range from 239,900 skr for the 2.0t Linear Griffin sedan and top out at 296,900 skr for the 1.9 TiD HP SportCombi. The full range and prices are as follows. Click to enlarge:


The seat you see is the new standard seat for vector griffin, itʼs available in black with beige accent, black with grey accent and beige with black accent.



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EnG Saab 9-5 SE Update

As regular readers know, I bought a 1999 Saab 9-5 last month, and I’ve enjoyed driving it.
But I must say, I’ve not enjoyed fixing it.
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UPDATE: I guess that I thought that it would be understood that since I bought an 8-year-old car, I bought into a few repairs (see comments on stereo, motor mount). As I said in one of the summary paragraphs, I expect to get my hands dirty a little. I went over this car pretty well at the time of purchase, I missed a couple of things, but my lament here is about two specific things: one, dumb luck that a few parts that worked well at the time of purchase failed in the first month of use, and two, that some of these failures are due to poor designs and/or manufacturing processes.
That is, this isn’t so much a “woe is me” whining rant as it is a frustration that our favorite brand is bitten by the same bug as many other manufacturers have fallen prey to: cheaper parts and less attention to longevity for better margins and/or competitive pricing. That’s all.
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Read moreEnG Saab 9-5 SE Update

Saab 9-5 vs BMW 5-series

Sometimes the motoring journos don’t ‘get’ Saab. So it’s up to we Saab owners to sing the virtues of these little Swedish cars.
A three year old Saab 9-5 against a new 5-series? Any motoring journo worth his seat on the gravy train would scoff. Surely, given a choice, anyone would prefer the 5, yes?
Introducing Chris, an Aussie and for the last 12 months, the owner of a 2004 Saab 9-5 Aero.
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Saab 9-5 Aero A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to go for a drive in a friend’s 2006 BMW 525i. We had all been out for lunch and he didn’t feel like driving home so I was given the keys. My usual ride is a 2004 9-5 Aero with automatic transmission and I was keen to compare it to the “ultimate driving machine.”
Technically this is not a true comparison as the 5 series BMW is not a direct competitor of the 9-5. It is also a very new design and a newer car than mine. Although I didn’t ask I believe the BMW I drove featured professional navigation, electric seats, full blue tooth kit and probably a few more gadgets that I couldn’t see (or find a use for). My 9-5 Aero is stock standard and the only option I would want (but unfortunately don’t have) is the ventilated seats.
The exterior
This comes down to personal preference. I prefer the previous 5 series exterior design and am not attracted to the current one. Of all the new BMWs i think the 3 series Coupe is the only good looking one.
Saab 9-5 AeroVerdict- On this count you know I will always prefer the 9-5 because that is the car that I chose for myself. I think the 2004 model year was a great combination of body kit and alloys. The new 9-5 is growing on me but I still prefer the older version.
The Driver’s Seat
The BMW’s seats, with full electric adjustment and memory, lacked lateral and thigh support and felt too short. A previous ride in the front passenger seat had indicated that the seats were uncomfortable and this drive confimed it. Whilst I didn’t slide around, the seats just didn’t seem right. The 9-5 Aero’s sport seats on the other hand provide lots of support, are very comfortable on long drives and look brilliant in their two tone grey/black leather.

Read moreSaab 9-5 vs BMW 5-series

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